Biotechnological Advances In Agriculture

By: Prof. R K Yadav, Dean, College of Agriculture, Lakhimpur Kheri Campus C.S. Azad Univ. of Agril. & Tech. Kanpur & Executive Editor-ICN Group KANPUR: Agriculture production in India has increased considerably during the last five decades largely due to the development and large scale cultivation of high-yielding dwarf varieties of rice and wheat, and greater applications of water and nutrients. This increase in food production has made India self-sufficient and contributed tremendously to food security. However, the population expected to reach 1.8 billion in 2050 will impose great demand for increased food production.…

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Health Benefits Of Flax Seed Or Linseed

By: Prof. R K Yadav, Dean, College of Agriculture, Lakhimpur Kheri Campus C.S. Azad Univ. of Agril. & Tech. Kanpur & Executive Editor-ICN Group KANPUR: Linseed or flax seed was cultivated Babylon as early as 3000 BC. In the 8th century, King Charlemagne believed so strongly in the health benefits of flaxseed that the passed laws requiring his subjects to consume it. In general, there exist two common cultivars of flax; one is predominantly grown for its oil seeds and the other variety for fiber. Seed flax generally features brown, and yellow or golden-yellow colour…

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Food Security: Irradiation Technology Essential To Minimise Post Harvest Losses

By: Rakesh Lohumi, Sr. Editor-ICN Group SHIMLA: Extensive use of irradiation technology to minimise post-harvest crop losses is imperative to ensure food security in a developing country like India with meagre land resources and a burgeoning population. Increasing production alone will not help given the unacceptably high levels of post-harvest losses which wipe out more than one-third of the total food and foodgrain production. While exact data for post-harvest crop losses is not available various independent studies and government reports estimate the losses from 35 to 55 percent. Globally the magnitude of…

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Invasive Weeds Undermining Farm Productivity, Biodiversity

By: Rakesh Lohumi, Sr. Editor-ICN Group SHIMLA: The Himalayas are a treasure house of medicinal and aromatic plants.With no effective strategy to thwart the march of invasive alien species, which pose a major threat to the indigenous flora, more and more area is being usurped by weeds like lantana, ageratum, parthenium (Congress grass) and eupatorium. The appearance of large gregarious patches of these weeds from the Himalayan foothills in the north to the Tamil Nadu in the south is a matter of grave concern as they pose a serious threat to the…

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Biofortification-To Overcome Malnutrition

By: Dr. Shweta, Deptt. of Genetics & Plant Breeding C.S. Azad Univ. of Agril. & Tech. Kanpur & Sr. Associate Editor-ICN Biofortification is the process by which the nutritional quality of food crops is improved for a feasible and cost-effective means of delivering micronutrients to populations that may have limited access to diverse diets and other micronutrient interventions. This is agriculture-based method of addressing micronutrient deficiency through plant breeding works.All over the world people in farm households in developing countries are now growing and co mmmnsuming biofortified crops. Micronutrient deficiencies afflict quite 2 billion people, or one in three…

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Champion Of Small & Resource-Poor Farmers In The Developing World: Dr. Norman Borlaug

Till the earth shall remain Green, the Life shall be seen.Food is the moral right of all who are born into this world. For the life, the food is as essential as the water and oxygen are. Dr. Norman Ernest Borlaug who was born on March 25, 1914, an American agronomist  led initiatives worldwide that contributed to the extensive increases in agricultural production termed the Green Revolution, Dr. Borlaug received his B.S. in forestry in 1937 and Ph.D. in plant pathology and genetics from the University of Minnesota in 1942. Dr. Borlaug never think only for his country but for him, the life of every human…

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Quality Protein Maize: A Solution for Nutritional Security

By: Prof. R K Yadav Dean, College of Agriculture, Lakhimpur Kheri Campus, C.S. Azad Univ. of Agril. & Tech. Kanpur & Executive Editor-ICN Group Maize (Zea mays), known in some English speaking countries as corn. In India, maize ranks 3rd after rice and wheat. Maize grown throughout the country ranging from Kashmir to Kanyakumari. Improving nutritional quality of agricultural crops is a noble goal. Improving nutritional quality in cereal crops is particularly important as the benefits can easily spread to hundreds of millions of people in a most rapid and effective manner without…

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The World Of Agritourism

By: Subhashini, Asstt. Editor-ICN The small landholders are the most precious part of a state- Thomas Jefferson, 3rd president of the United States NEW DELHI: Agricultural tourism or Agri-tourism has been a widely discussed topic since the last 15-20 years. However, what I believe is that this phenomenon has been a part of our economy since thousands of years in many different forms. Agritourism is the idea of bringing urban residents to rural areas for leisure travel and spending. In today’s world, where the mechanization has expanded many-fold, people seem to have lost touch…

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Biofertilizers: Need Of Todays For Sustainable Agriculture

By: Dr.Ripudaman Singh, Associate Editor-ICN  NEW DELHI: According to an estimate 240 million tonnes of food grains will be required to feed about 1.2 billion population in India and to achieve this milestone, a sizable quantity of mineral fertilizers will be required. India is fourth largest user of chemical fertilizers (12.5 million tonnes of NPK nutrients) in the world. Its soils are still being depleted of their inherent nutrients reserve as a result of wide gap between addition and removal. One tone of produce removes an average of 32kg nitrogen, 12kg phosphorus…

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Ethanol: An Antidote For Sugarcane Farmers

By: Hardik Murarka, Sr. Associate Editor-ICN India is the second largest producer of sugarcane after Brazil and more than 50 million people are associated directly or indirectly from sugarcane industry for their livelihood. But due to glut in sugar market, the mills are not in best of financial position thus there is an inability to pay the mandatory fair and remunerative price (FRP) for sugarcane to the farmers. The reason for cash strapped mils is excessive production of sugar. It has become a national problem. In 2017-18 and 2018-19, annual sugar…

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